Long-term treatment with low-dose aspirin seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with diabetes, according to Taiwanese research published in the Journal of Women’s Health.

Researchers retrospectively analysed 148,739 women with diabetes aged, on average, 63.3 years. Of these, 27,378 were taking low-dose aspirin (75-165mg daily). Overall, using aspirin reduced the risk of breast cancer by 18 per cent after allowing for age and co-morbidities.

Taking a cumulative dose of aspirin exceeding 88,900mg over a mean of 8.5 years reduced the risk of breast cancer by 47 per cent compared to non-users. Low (<8,600mg) and medium (8,600-88,900mg) cumulative doses of aspirin did not significantly reduce breast cancer risk. The incidence of breast cancer seemed to decline after one year of aspirin use.

Additional studies need to confirm these findings, say the authors.

DOI:10.1089/jwh.2016.6040

Originally Published by Pharmacy Magazine

Recommended

Scenario: BNF interactions update

An email about changes to the interactions section in the BNF has worried Vicki, the pharmacy technician...

Dealing with diabetes

Charles Gladwin looks at pharmacy’s public health role in diabetes and considers the opportunities around diabetes r...

Popular

Lloyds Pharmacy Summer Placements 2018

Our paid 6 week summer placement will provide you with the opportunity to showcase your potential and gain hands-on expe...

Walking in a pharmacy wonderland

The stress of Christmas, cold, dark weather and festive frivolities can mean people are more susceptible to illness at t...

Advances in pharmacy innovation showcased in Wales

The importance of innovation in pharmacy practice is being explored today as the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in Wales h...