Long-term treatment with low-dose aspirin seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with diabetes, according to Taiwanese research published in the Journal of Women’s Health.

Researchers retrospectively analysed 148,739 women with diabetes aged, on average, 63.3 years. Of these, 27,378 were taking low-dose aspirin (75-165mg daily). Overall, using aspirin reduced the risk of breast cancer by 18 per cent after allowing for age and co-morbidities.

Taking a cumulative dose of aspirin exceeding 88,900mg over a mean of 8.5 years reduced the risk of breast cancer by 47 per cent compared to non-users. Low (<8,600mg) and medium (8,600-88,900mg) cumulative doses of aspirin did not significantly reduce breast cancer risk. The incidence of breast cancer seemed to decline after one year of aspirin use.

Additional studies need to confirm these findings, say the authors.


Originally Published by Pharmacy Magazine


Hand, foot and mouth disease

This pharmacy scenario is about hand, foot and mouth disease.


This CPPE module is about antibacterials.


Challenges of Pharmacy in Malaysia

Studying abroad on a summer programme offers a fantastic opportunity, Shiva visited Malaysia to find out more about phar...

Absentee Election Nomination

Members unable to attend the Executive elections on 8th April who wish to run for a position on the BPSA Executive 2018-...

If at first you don't succeed…come back stronger

Speaking in front of around 100 students is an incredibly daunting but rewarding experience.. Read how Jess's experienc...