Long-term treatment with low-dose aspirin seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with diabetes, according to Taiwanese research published in the Journal of Women’s Health.

Researchers retrospectively analysed 148,739 women with diabetes aged, on average, 63.3 years. Of these, 27,378 were taking low-dose aspirin (75-165mg daily). Overall, using aspirin reduced the risk of breast cancer by 18 per cent after allowing for age and co-morbidities.

Taking a cumulative dose of aspirin exceeding 88,900mg over a mean of 8.5 years reduced the risk of breast cancer by 47 per cent compared to non-users. Low (<8,600mg) and medium (8,600-88,900mg) cumulative doses of aspirin did not significantly reduce breast cancer risk. The incidence of breast cancer seemed to decline after one year of aspirin use.

Additional studies need to confirm these findings, say the authors.

DOI:10.1089/jwh.2016.6040

Originally Published by Pharmacy Magazine

Recommended

Type 2 diabetes: part two

This module is the second in our CPPE series about type 2 diabetes.

Pain linked to dementia

Persistent pain is associated with more rapid memory decline and increased risk of dementia, according to a new analysis

Popular

Promoting long, healthy lives - the role of pharmacy

This NPA-accredited module, developed by CIG Healthcare Partnership on behalf of Merck Consumer Health, highlights risk ...

Apply now to become a BPSA Representative 2017-2018

Are you passionate about student pharmacy? Do you want to develop your skills, and enhance your CV? Do you want to make...

Hints and Tips for Pre-reg interviews

As a fresh-faced young pre-reg, I can remember only too well preparing for interviews last year. Here are a few tips and...