The proportion of smokers who benefit from smoking cessation medications declines during the first year of treatment, according to a new meta-analysis of 61 studies involving 27,647 people.

About 40 per cent of patients using smoking cessation drugs showed sustained abstinence after three months (37.1 per cent with bupropion, 34.8 per cent with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and 39.3 per cent with varenicline) but after six months this declined to about a quarter (25.9, 26.6 and 25.4 per cent respectively).

After a year, about a fifth remained abstinent: 19.9 per cent with bupropion, 19.8 per cent with NRT and 18.7 per cent with varenicline. Abstinence rates among controls were 18.8 per cent at three months, 14.3 per cent at six months and 11.4 per cent at 12 months. The net benefit of the cessation treatment compared to controls declined from 17.3 per cent at three months to 11.8 per cent at six months and 8.2 per cent at 12 months.

The authors comment that healthcare providers “would be well served by realistic expectations when prescribing” smoking cessation drugs. In addition, clinicians could plan to continue to intervene over the longer term in people taking cessation treatments.

Addiction doi:10.1111/add.14134

 

Originally Published by Pharmacy Magazine

Recommended

Reflux

This pharmacy scenario is about reflux.

Oral pain, children and pharmacy

Oral pain is the commonest reason why parents visit a pharmacy for pain relief for children, new research shows

Popular

Executive Co-option April 2018

The position of Vice President remains vacant following the Executive elections held on 31st March 2018. Co-option for t...

Beating eating disorders

The causes of eating disorders might not be as obvious as you think, and looking out for wider signs and symptoms could ...

EU pharmacy report points to growth in services

The PGEU’s 2017 Annual Report surveys European countries on the extent and variety of services offered in their co...